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Edited By: Musa Ahmed

Desk Editor (English)

Prime Minister urges to US to put pressure on Myanmar to stop Rohingya pushing

30 Aug, 2017 18:03:00

Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina has requested the United States to put pressure on Myanmar to halt pushing its nationals into Bangladesh.

 

 

 

"We’ve given shelter to a huge number of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh on humanitarian grounds and it's a big problem for us. So, I call upon you to exert pressure on Myanmar in this matter," she said when US acting Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asian Affairs Alice Wells met her at her office on Wednesday.

 

 

At the conference, the US assistant secretary asked the Prime Minister about whether there is any political dialogue between Bangladesh and Myanmar on resolving the Rohingya problem.

 

 

Wells, also US acting special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan, expressed the US' interest to work with Bangladesh to combat terrorism and highly appreciated Bangladesh government's initiatives for curbing the menace.

 

 

 

The Prime Minister reiterated Bangladesh’s ‘zero-tolerance’ policy on terrorism.

 

"We won't allow our land to be used for carrying out terrorist acts in other countries," she said.

 

 

The US assistant secretary highly supported Bangladesh's massive socio-economic development in different fields, especially the attainment of 7.24 percent GDP growth, under Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina’s able leadership.

 

 

 

The Prime Minister renewed her call to the US to send back convicted death-row killers of Bangabandhu who are now staying there.

 

 On promoting the private sector, she said her government has opened up all the sectors in this regard.

 

 Noting that the country's media is enjoying full freedom, the Prime Minister said it is freely criticising the government and there is no interference from the government.

 

 The premier said there are some 750 daily newspapers in the country. "We’ve given permission to some 44 TV channels in the private sector and 24 of them are now functioning."

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