Dhaka, Tue, 25 Sep, 2018

Should you stop eating chewing gum and bread?

19 Feb, 2017 18:26:28

Heath Desk:A new study reveals that chewing gum and bread could be harmful for your health.

Long-term exposure to a popular food additive leaves the body more prone to infections, scientists claim.

Titanium dioxide, found in a variety of foods as E171, damages cell structures inside the intestines, research suggests.

And not only does this allow for more harmful bacteria to enter the digestive system, but it prevents some nutrients from being absorbed.

Chewing gum contains titanium dioxide - found on an ingredients list as E171. Long-term exposure could leave the body prone to infections

Chewing gum contains titanium dioxide - found on an ingredients list as E171. Long-term exposure could leave the body prone to infections

Researchers exposed a small intestinal cell model to the equivalent of a meal's worth of titanium oxide nanoparticles over four hours.

They also tested the same model with three meal's worth over five days - deemed chronic exposure.

But only those who had been repeatedly given the additive had any negative effects, according to the study by Binghamton University.

Chronic exposure was found to have an effect on the ability of intestinal cells called microvilli - designed to help absorb nutrients.

This was found to weaken their intestines, and made zinc, iron and fatty acids more difficult to absorb.

The ability to break food down was also negatively affected, the study published in the journal NanoImpact discovered.

The common food additive damages cell structures inside the intestines, research suggests

The common food additive damages cell structures inside the intestines, research suggests

Study co-author Professor Gretchen Mahler said: 'Titanium oxide is a common food additive and people have been eating a lot of it for a long time.

Titanium dioxide crosses the intestinal wall in animals to reach other parts of the body, a study found last month.

French researchers discovered that swallowing regular doses of E171 led to a non-malignant stage of early colon cancer in 40 per cent of animals.

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